At a crossroads plus the first issue of Vogue Magazine

Good morning everyone and I hope this post finds you in good spirits. As for me, well I am at a crossroads with this blog. Don’t get me wrong, I love featuring the beautiful editorials I see and I especially love when they have some form of inspiration from my beloved continent, Africa. But I am also very opinionated and  can be quite critical about this thing called fashion.

Now, I am a student first and I honestly love to read and learn. But lately I have become so bored with reading about luxury fashion and style. I am also guilty of following which way the fashion industry dictates we follow, posting new fashion related news as fast as I can with the hopes that me page will rank higher. I am tired of providing inspiration as gleaned from other sites. In fact, I have grown tired of imitating others that I decided to do something about it. I decided to get an access to Vogue archives. Okay, in case you don’t know, but my bible version of fashion and style is Vogue Magazine.
first issue of vogue magazine
I spent my entire Sunday perusing through the archives. I read through the first issue of Vogue Magazine which was a pure delight to read. It was published December 17th, 1892 with an image of 3 debutantes. It also cost 10 cents. The ads back then are totally different from now and they included things like ads for fashionable hats or oriental rugs or china, glass and art pottery. Vogue at that time was issued weekly on Saturdays and the cost for a year’s worth of subscription was $4.00,  which is the going rate for today’s monthly subscription. The first acting editor was Josephine Redding and the publisher was Arthur Baldwin Turnure. The magazine’s mission at that time was to be “a dignified authentic journal of society, fashion, and the ceremonial side of life” albeit through images. Vogue began with an exceptionally large list of annual subscribers and abundant advertising. Measures were taken to make it’s pages distinctively attractive given the magazine’s vision (similar to what we see today) of being “an extensive, accurate and invaluable guide to buyers of fine goods.” I was impressed by the history of Vogue because from the first issue, they were extremely clear about their intent. It would seem that they have managed to keep things in order ever since they first appeared on scene.
first issue of vogue magazine-a

Of course I searched the archives for keywords such as African fashion and I was thrilled when I read references to our fashion in those days. I was especially in awe of other articles that were as simple as a description of a dress or a description of Parisian society (you know how I love anything-Paris related), even descriptions of turbans. Reading through the archives has given me the jolt I needed with my intentions for this blog. So personally, and to echo the words from this first issue, fashion for me, “if it is to exist at all, must have it’s marks and limitations.”
first issue of vogue magazine-adfirst issue of vogue magazine-bfirst issue of vogue magazine-1

At this junction, I have reached my limit with fast fashion. I am focused now on towering mentally above other fashion blogs so as to achieve the distinction of being a blog worth knowing, in terms of my quality of writing and my knowledge on the history of fashion. We are at a period were fast fashion is dominating intellectual fashion, with fashion bloggers being the fashionable fad for the moment. In fact, financial constraints for most magazine have enabled them to dump the whole idea of critiquing fashion altogether. There is so much we can learn from history, there is so much knowledge I can share. Thus, at this crossroads, my intent is to do just that. Isioma’s Style Report will now be a daily essay on luxury fashion and style, one that is dignified and authentic with a unique sense of history. Come with me on this great journey!

Source: Vogue Archive

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