Becoming a super-connector of African Fashion

Becoming a super-connector of African Fashion

Happy New Month of July. This time of the year is always exciting for me because, well it’s my birthday month. But enough about me, I would love to share how one can become a super-connector of African Fashion. A super-connector hey! What in the world is that. Well according to entrepreneur.com, a super-connector is that person who knows everyone and everyone knows them, kind of like Adiat Disu of Adiree.com, I think she is a super-connector with what she has managed to do with African Fashion Week New York since 2009. She and her company seem to be valuable entities for African Fashion, matching people with opportunities and in doing so, leaving connections with a positive opinion about her and her abilities.

So how can you, yes you, become a super-connector of African Fashion. Below are a few tips for anyone trying to become a super-connector as gleaned from entrepreneur.com. They also note that none of the tips are more important than another, but it is important to understand your personal strengths and weaknesses in each area so that you can focus on improving them one at a time.

Super-connectors know what we want.

One of the first questions a super-connector may ask you after you meet them is, “How can I help you?” This question is used to figure out exactly what it is a person wants so they can immediately create a lasting relationship with you by figuring out how to help you achieve your need. It is a brilliant tactic.  Super-connectors like to stay in “in the know.” They will know what each of their connections are capable of, who is in their network, and what connections need or are looking for. This allows them to instantaneously connect people based on needs and abilities, while increasing their own value.

Super-connectors make time for their connections.

A key element in staying connected and remembered is face time. People who live the life of a connector do not eat lunch alone; they find someone to eat with. They do not wait in the airport during layovers; they call someone in that city and meet for coffee. Connector types are constantly updating their network of their travel plans and whereabouts so that they remain fresh in the minds of their network. Even if every person they know is unavailable to meet, they will remember that they were invited to meet. These face-to-face interactions go along way for connectors.

Super-connectors take notes.

When most people add a new contact to their Rolodex, they take down basic information, such as phone number, email, or the person’s job title. Connectors go a step further and take notes. A connector may write down their first impressions of the person, how they met, where they met, and any immediate information gathered from the person. A connector would also make note of anyone that they connected the person to and why. This allows connectors to make everyone they meet for a second time to feel important and remembered.

Super-connectors are not afraid to loop in everyone.

When a connector has a question about something or finds something suspicious, they are not afraid to add everyone involved on an email and ask. This is what makes connectors transparent and in control of their network. Connectors do not allow people to change their opinion of someone or a situation without a public questioning. This is what makes a connector trustworthy and why they can trust people in their network. Being trustworthy and trusting is a key for super-connectors.

Are you trying to be a super-connector? Start small and stop to think, do you know any super-connectors?  Having a super-connector in your network will help you in expanding your network and give you someone to observe and you work to hone in on your skills.

In all, I hope these 4 habits of super-connectors maybe helpful to anyone wishing to push African Fashion to new heights. Remember, know what people want, make time for people, take notes and do not be afraid to be transparent with your practice of connecting people to African Fashion.

Source: Entrepreneur

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: